top of page

Historic Farm | Why Do We Grow Garlic, Sage and Chamomile in The Preserve?



Learning Preserve Historic Farm | Why Do We Grow Garlic, Sage and Chamomile in The Preserve?
Historic Farm


BECAUSE THE CRITTERS AND WILDLIFE DON'T EAT IT!


...and Bootleggers of times past could be confident that their stash would not be dug up by animals where buried :)


Historic Farm


Garlic


Our Garlic is pretty awesome for a few reasons. First off, besides being a centuries old strain, it's packed with flavor, which can make even the simplest dish taste amazing. But beyond that, garlic is super healthy too. It's loaded with vitamins and minerals like vitamin C, vitamin B6, manganese, and selenium.


Plus, it's got compounds like allicin, which has been linked to all sorts of health benefits, like boosting your immune system and lowering risk of certain diseases. And let's not forget its versatility—you can use it in just about any dish, from pasta sauces to stir-fries, to add a punch of flavor and nutrition. So yeah, garlic might be small, but it sure packs a big punch when it comes to both taste and health benefits.



Sage


Our Sage serves multiple purposes, from enhancing cocktails and culinary creations to crafting herbal remedies, syrups aromas, tea —and yes, even for burning!


Burning sage involves igniting sage leaves to produce smoke, which is believed to purify the air in your home. In alternative medicine circles, burning sage is thought to release negative energy, repel insects, enhance intuition, cleanse objects, and promote relaxation. Some opt for sage cleansing sprays as an alternative method. While sage has a rich history in traditional medicine and spiritual practices, further research is needed to fully understand its potential benefits for medical or mental health purposes.


It won't be uncommon for members to get a whiff of sage in the air at the Estate.



Chamomile


Chamomile Flower is beautiful and fun to harvest. Walk through the rows, spread your fingers just below the flower head, gently pull up...and Pop!, the flower heads pops off into your hand to be dropped in your belly bag.


The most popular way to consume chamomile is by drinking the plant as a tea. But there are other ways to prepare chamomile. It can be used as an essential oil and in capsule form. Some people might consume chamomile flowers as food, such as a salad ingredient or as a salad dressing.


Chamomile is also used in many cosmetic products, including: 


  • Shampoos

  • Soaps

  • Lotions

  • Detergents

  • Perfumes

  • Sunscreens

  • Mouthwash

  • Deodorant

  • Toothpaste


Note: If you are considering ingesting chamomile in a form other than tea, especially in large amounts, it’s best to check in with your healthcare provider first

Comments


Commenting has been turned off.
bottom of page